Home > Uncategorized > Implemented virtual desktops? Please contribute to this survey!

Implemented virtual desktops? Please contribute to this survey!

Storage IOPS are one of the most important considerations for sizing a virtual desktop environment.    Most folks do not have a good handle on the breakdown of writes vs. reads in their Windows desktop environment, which is incredibly important to know when implementing virtual desktops since it has a huge impact on disk array performance when using RAID5.    Think a “heavy” I/O user uses about 20 IOPS during steady-state workload?  Not if you’re using RAID5 disk!   It can actually be as high as 70 back-end IOPS.

Originally, many VDI vendors posted numbers indicating that the mix of writes vs. reads in a desktop environment was about 50/50 (which is still way more writes than the average server workload that usually follows the 80/20 rule in favor of reads).     I’ve also seen 60/40 and 70/30 thrown about more recently.    Andre Leibovici (http://myvirtualcloud.net), a well-known authority on VDI, is regularly seeing steady-state workloads approaching 80% writes.    In that scenario, your 20 IOPS heavy-user ends up generating 68 IOPS on the RAID5 disk array, thanks to the write overhead of RAID5.   ((20 x 80%) x 4) + (20 x 20%) = 68.

The best way to continue to get clarity on this topic is going to involve gathering more data from real-world customers.   This is where your help is much needed if you have implemented virtual desktops, even if it’s just a POC so far.    Please click the link below and follow the instructions on how to contribute to this survey.

The VDI Read/Write Ratio Challenge

http://myvirtualcloud.net/?p=2352

 

 

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